Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

News Top Stories

older | 1 | .... | 2635 | 2636 | (Page 2637) | 2638 | 2639 | .... | 2672 | newer

    0 0


    U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers said they are searching for someone who was believed to have fallen from a cliff off Otay Mountain.

    The agency reported the search via Twitter, saying "#AirandmarineOperations assets are assisting. 

    A UH-60 Blackhawk was deployed in case officials need to transport a victim to a nearby hospital.

    Otay Mountain is located east of Chula Vista, approximately 17 miles east of the San Ysidro Port of Entry.

    No other information was available.

    Please refresh this page for updates on this story. Details may change as more information becomes available.



    Photo Credit: Sherene Tagharobi

    0 0


    Both coasts are expected to be hit by wet and windy weather just in time for the busiest travel days of the holidays, NBC News reported.

    Heavy rains and wind gusts up to 60 mph are expected from Northern California to Washington state Wednesday night and into Thursday. On the East Coast, Central and Southern Florida are anticipating heavy winds, hail and possible tornadoes, forecasters said. The North Carolina coast is facing the same as the storm marches north.

    By Thursday, the nation's worst day to travel, the storm will start affecting the Northeast, according to the National Weather Service. Travel hubs Washington, D.C., New York City and Boston could all see up to 4 inches of rain and possible flooding between Thursday night and Friday night.

    Before the forecast, holiday travelers were warned that they could see traffic that would multiply their travel time by four. A record-breaking 112.5 million Americans are expected to take to the roads, skies and rails this holiday weekend, starting Wednesday, according to AAA.



    Photo Credit: Michael Duva/Getty Images, File

    0 0


    With the start of the new year, the California Department of Motor Vehicles announced a few changes due to laws going into effect as of Jan. 1, 2019.

    These are the new laws or changes to the laws already in force for 2019:

    Temporary Paper Plates (AB 516): Authorized California dealers must place a paper plate with a number and expiration date on every vehicle they sell, whether new or used. The objective is to reduce the number of offenders passing through payment booths and improve road safety.

    Gender Identity: (SB 179): With this new law, people who apply for a license or identity card will have the option to select their own gender, which includes the categories for female, male or non-binary. Those who choose the "No binary" option will receive a card with an "X" gender category. 

    Breathalyzer on Engine Start (SB 1046): Between Jan. 1, 2019 and 2026, repeat offenders for DUI or those who receive a first DUI offense and have caused injuries, must install a breathalyzer on the engine ignition (IDD) for a period of 12 to 48 months. These regulations apply to DUI infractions involving alcohol consumption or the combined use of alcohol and drugs.

    Verification of Polluting Emissions (AB 1274): The exemption from smog verification for vehicles that have been purchased new will extend from six to eight years. During the two years of this exemption, the vehicle owner will not have to do the smog check but pay $25. The charge of $20 during the first six years of exemption to verify smog will continue. 

    Driving Privileges for Minors (AB 2685): Courts will no longer be able to suspend, restrict or delay issuing a minor's driver's license for one year for truancy or for being under the guardianship of the state. Suspensions or delays reported to the DMV prior to Jan. 1, 2019 will remain in effect.

    Motorized Scooters (AB 2989): People over 18 years old will no longer need to use a bicycle helmet to use a motorized scooter. This law also amends existing law that prohibits a person from using a motorized scooter on a highway that has a speed limit greater than 25 miles per hour, unless it is on a special Class IV bikeway as well as Class II.

    Unsafe or Unattached Loads on Vehicles (AB 1925): The DMV must include at least one question on 20 percent of knowledge tests (written exams) on traffic laws about California's unsecured load code. The purpose is, in part, an effort to verify that applicants understand  that abandoning or dumping any animal is a criminal offense. 

    Decals for Low Emission Vehicles (AB 544): The green and white decals for the circulation of low emission vehicles in collective transport lanes (HOV) will be valid until Jan. 1, 2019. The DMV created a new sticker program to allow certain low-polluting vehicles to travel in HOV lanes regardless of the number of passengers in the vehicle for a period of four years. Vehicles that have received a green or white decal between Jan. 1, 2017 and March 1, 2018 will be eligible to request a red decal and will give them access to the HOV lanes until Jan. 1, 2022. The DMV will also issue light violet color decals in 2019 that will grant access to the HOV lanes until Jan. 1, 2023.

    Passing Waste Service Vehicles (AB 2115): Driver approaching a waste collection truck with its amber lights flashing must move into an adjacent lane, if possible, and pass at a safe distance. If you can't change lanes, slow to a safe and reasonable speed. It's part of an effort to protect sanitation workers. 



    Photo Credit: Richard Vogel/AP

    People line up before the doors open at the California Department of Motor Vehicles office in the Van Nuys section of Los Angeles, Aug. 7, 2018.People line up before the doors open at the California Department of Motor Vehicles office in the Van Nuys section of Los Angeles, Aug. 7, 2018.

    0 0


    Justice Department policies that made it harder for immigrants to claim asylum if they were victims of domestic or gang violence were dismissed Wednesday by a federal judge who found they violated existing immigration laws, NBC News reported.

    The policies were announced in June by then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who said that fear of domestic abuse or gang violence was an unacceptable basis for granting asylum.

    But U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan in Washington, D.C., permanently blocked government "from continuing to apply those policies and from removing plaintiffs who are currently in the United States without first providing credible fear determinations consistent with the immigration laws."

    Sullivan ordered the Justice Department to return plaintiffs in the lawsuit who'd been deported and give them new interviews over whether they could credibly claim asylum.



    Photo Credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images, File

    This June 11, 2018, file photo shows then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions deliver remarks at a Justice Department legal training event in Tysons, Virginia. Sessions spoke on his intention to limit reasons for people to claim asylum in the U.S.This June 11, 2018, file photo shows then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions deliver remarks at a Justice Department legal training event in Tysons, Virginia. Sessions spoke on his intention to limit reasons for people to claim asylum in the U.S.

    0 0


    Police are looking for more victims who may have been flashed by a man in Oceanside just days before Halloween.

    The man exposed himself on at least two occasions on Oct. 29, according to the Oceanside Police Department.

    In the first, the man exposed himself to a passerby on a street near Oceanside Pier. The second happened inside Discount Dance Supply on El Camino Real, north of state Route 78, OPD said. 

    The two incidents happened within 5 miles of each other and about 5 hours apart.

    Police released images of the man on Wednesday in order to identify more witnesses who may have been flashed.

    At the time, the man was wearing athletic pants, a blue vest and had his head wrapped in a white towel, police said. 

    Anyone with information was asked to call OPD at (760)435-4690.

    No other information was available.


    0 0


    Watch the full story tonight on NBC 7 at 6 p.m.

    As a parent, having your name on your child's birth certificate is very important. Without it, you can't enroll your child in school or make medical decisions on their behalf. 

    But Chrissy LaBrecque, a North Park resident, said she is being denied that right, even though she's the biological mother of her infant son. 

    NBC 7 Investigates found out about her situation because Chrissy works at NBC 7 in San Diego. 

    Her baby, named Camden, was born through in-vitro fertilization, a difficult and expensive process. 

    LaBrecque’s longtime partner, Andrea Roehl, carried and delivered him. 

    [[503087201,c,647,828]] 

    “The best thing about being a mom is just seeing the baby grow,” LaBrecque said. 

    LaBrecque loves her new role as Camden's mom but she said the state of California will not accept her as his parent.

    [[503086731,c,556,808]] 

    Camden was born at the Kaiser Permanente San Diego Medical Center. When Chrissy and Andrea filled out Camden's birth certificate at Kaiser, the couple said there was no place on the certificate where they could both be listed as his parent. 

    “We just thought she's the mother and I'm the mother. it should be fine,” Roehl said. 

    A Supreme Court ruling last year allows same-sex couples to both be listed as parents, but only if they are married. 

    LaBrecque and Roehl are not. 

    “We chose not to be married first and spend our money towards making a baby,” Roehl said. 

    The couple would find out that was a big problem. Since LaBrecque isn’t listed on Camden's birth certificate, she cannot collect Paid Family Leave or money that all new working parents are entitled to in California. 

    “I finally got somebody on the phone and they said well we need a birth certificate. You know your name has to be on it in order to get paid from the state,” LaBrecque said. 

    The couple went back to Kaiser, for help but they said hospital staff told them there was nothing they could do because the paperwork had already been sent to the state Department of Public Health, which certifies birth certificates. 

    A spokesperson for Kaiser Permanente would not agree to an on-camera interview, nor would they answer specific questions from NBC 7. 

    Jennifer Dailard, a spokesperson for Kaiser Permanente, sent NBC 7 this statement, "At Kaiser Permanente, the safety and care of our patients is paramount at all times. While we cannot comment on a specific case due to privacy laws, regarding matters related to the completion of birth certificates for individuals who are not married or in a legally registered domestic partnership, we must follow the law and specific direction of the courts in all instances." 

    NBC 7 Investigates found the staff at Kaiser were following the law, but it’s those laws that some feel are the problem. 

    “There is one area of law that has not evolved as quickly as the others and that's with respect to unmarried unregistered same-gender couples,” said Leigh Kretzschmar, a Family Law attorney. 

    Kretzschmar said that policy isn't fair because unmarried, heterosexual parents can establish paternity by simply signing what’s called a “Declaration of Paternity”. That can be done in the hospital after the child is born or soon thereafter. But unmarried, same-sex couples don't have that option. 

    “Same gender couples are forced to go get a court order. They're forced to go through an expensive process,” Kretzschmar said. “It can easily be a $3,000 to $5,000 extra step that they have to undergo whereas opposite gender couples don't have to do that.” 

    [[503089161,c,900,425]]

    Another option is that LaBrecque could "adopt' her own biological child, which also takes times and costs money. 

    “I would have to adopt my own biological son,” LaBrecque said. “I mean it sounds absolutely insane.” 

    LaBrecque and Roehl believe it's discrimination and they want same-sex parents, transgender parents, and their children to be treated equally. 

    “I mean this is California in 2018 almost 2019,” LaBrecque said. “There should be some sort of paperwork that matches up to what heterosexual couples are signing in the hospital, the declaration of paternity that they get to sign. It is a huge emotional burden on both Andrea and me.” 

    A new proposed state law, AB-2684, would potentially fix this problem for unmarried gay and lesbian couples. The law would allow couples to be listed on their child’s birth certificate, without going to court.

    That bill could be voted on as early as January 2019 and if approved, the new law would take effect in 2020. 

    But, that’s not going to help couples like LaBrecque and Roehl. LaBrecque said she and her partner will most likely have to receive a court order from a judge, in order to be listed on Camden’s birth certificate as his parent.


    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    Chrissy LaBrecque, her partner Andrea Roehl and their son Camden.Chrissy LaBrecque, her partner Andrea Roehl and their son Camden.

    0 0


    The California Highway Patrol is investigating the death of an elderly woman found in a highway rest area bathroom the week before Christmas. 

    The unidentified woman was found Tuesday at the Aliso Creek Rest Area along Interstate 5, California Highway Patrol officers said.

    The rest area is along I-5, approximately 68 miles north of downtown San Diego and near Camp Pendleton. 

    More than 24 hours after she was found, the CHP said they did not know the woman's identity. 

    She had no obvious signs of trauma, deputies said. Crews with Camp Pendleton Fire Department pronounced the woman dead at the scene. 

    The woman was described by the San Diego County Sheriff's Department as a senior citizen who may have been a transient.

    Anyone with information on this incident can contact the CHP at (800) 835-5247 or (800) TELL-CHP.



    Photo Credit: Angelos Papazis/NBC 7

    0 0


    You don't need to spend a fortune to have fun in this city.

    Photo Credit: Monica Garske

    A holiday-time staple, and always free and fun for the whole family, is scouring neighborhoods for the best holiday light displays, something San Diego has no shortage of. Neighborhoods like Starlight Circle in Santee, pictured here, is known for going all out for the holidays with dozens of dazzling displays. Check out our map of some the must-see San Diego neighborhoods.A holiday-time staple, and always free and fun for the whole family, is scouring neighborhoods for the best holiday light displays, something San Diego has no shortage of. Neighborhoods like Starlight Circle in Santee, pictured here, is known for going all out for the holidays with dozens of dazzling displays. Check out our map of some the must-see San Diego neighborhoods.

    0 0


    Police are looking for a suspect who robbed a Serra Mesa video game store with a gun Wednesday morning.

    The suspect arrived at GameStop on Murphy Canyon Road near Aero Drive at 10:35 a.m., according to the San Diego Police Department.

    The suspect then displayed a handgun to the employees, demanding cash and several items, Lt. Christian Sharp told NBC 7.

    After GameStop workers met his demands, the suspect fled on foot, SDPD said.

    Officers described the suspect as a 5-foot-8 man in his 30s. He had short, dark hair and a goatee.

    He was last seen wearing an orange hard hat, an orange safety vest, a dark blue shirt under a vest, and blue jeans said Officer Billy Hernandez.

    Police consider the suspected robber armed and dangerous and said to immediately call SDPD if anyone sees him.

    SDPD Robbery is investigating.


    0 0


    A Ramona man doesn’t need Rudolph to guide his truck because he has 2,600 lights to get the job done.

    Tony Wilson decorates his sleigh-with-wheels every year, spreading holiday cheer wherever he goes.

    “It just makes people smile when they see this go,” Wilson told NBC 7.

    The decorating process takes roughly 22 hours in total, he said.

    Wilson starts at his truck’s tailgate and runs the lights around. He uses miniature light clips and suction cups to hold everything in place.

    After the holiday lights are wrapped around his 2018 Ford F-150, he carefully aligns them in neat rows.

    The lights aren’t powered by Christmas magic, but rather a 500 W portable power inverter to keep the show on the road.

    Wilson started decorating his ride in 2006 when his church hosted a "Light of Life" contest. He decorated his boat with holiday lights, pulling it with his truck.

    Back then, he said he only slightly outlined his truck with lights.

    Wilson won the contest, sparking his lighting legacy to life.

    The church only held the contest for a few years. Wilson joked they stopped because he kept winning.

    Over the past 12 years, Wilson’s design evolved. He started adding lights to the doors in 2017.

    The Ramona resident parks his truck in his front yard, plugs it in, and creates a show-stopping display.

    He said he also likes to ride around town and see people’s reactions.

    One day, Wilson was at a store and someone came up to him and said, “Your decorations give me a fuzzy and warm feeling inside, and I appreciate you.”

    The compliments follow the bright truck; even some National City police officers stop by for a picture this year.

    At the start of the new year, Wilson takes down the decorations, though this process is much quicker than his set-up, only lasting about an hour and a half.

    “I don’t like taking them down,” he told NBC 7.

    He said he does his annual lighting tradition for the people.



    Photo Credit: Tony Wilson
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    0 0


    San Diego County's health administration is urging residents to get the flu shot after two unvaccinated pregnant women were hospitalized with influenza. 

    The two women, ages 40 and 30 and both in their third trimesters, spent at least a week in the intensive care unit due to complications from the flu, The county Health and Human Services Agency (HHSA) said Wednesday.

    One woman was hospitalized for 16 days with a strain of influenza A. 

    Public Health Officer Dr. Wilma Wooten said pregnant women are more susceptible to the flu and more likely to experience severe complications if the virus is contracted. 

    "Changes in the immune system, heart and lungs during pregnancy make pregnant women and women up to two weeks after delivery more susceptible to severe illness from the flu," Wooten said. 

    She noted the flu can also be harmful to an unborn child, who becomes more sensitive to fever and other adverse outcomes.

    HHSA said pregnant women can get the flu shot during any trimester of their pregnancy but should not take the nasal spray version.

    Other groups more susceptible to the flu are people with chronic medical conditions, senior citizens, and caregivers of those who are at risk. 

    The vaccine is available at the county public health center to those that do not have medical insurance. A list of locations can be found here or by calling 211. 

    Influenza cases are down this year when compared to the same time last season, 940 this year and 1,641 last year, but this week saw an almost double in confirmed flu cases when compared to last week, HHSA data shows. 


    0 0


    An Ohio man trying to cash his paycheck from a new job was handcuffed and put in the back of a police car after a bank teller called 911 on the false belief the check was fraudulent, NBC News reports.

    Now the bank is apologizing as reports of the incident have sparked a new hashtag, #BankingWhileBlack.

    Paul McCowns, of Cleveland, went to a Huntington Bank branch in the suburb of Brooklyn, Ohio, on Dec. 1 to cash his paycheck of a little over $1,000, according to police and the bank.

    McCowns told police he provided two forms of identification, as well as his fingerprints, which is standard policy for non-account holders at the bank.



    Photo Credit: Igor - stock.adobe.com

    0 0


    ‘Tis the season...for travel.

    Thousands of San Diegans will be leaving from airports, or on freeways, and train depots to visit family or take off for a holiday vacation. NBC 7 Responds is here to remind you to do one last thing before you leave; notify your credit card company and bank.

    The rising number of credit card scams and the increased frequency of card skimming has forced banks and financial institutions to act fast when unusual charges, in unusual places, occur.

    While before consumers were asked to notify their bank before traveling out of the country, many say trips out of the state, or even the county, warrant notification.

    “It’s better safe than sorry, you should let your financial institution know if you’re out of your normal purchase area,” says Todd Lane, CEO and president of California Coast Credit Union.

    Lane says the most frequent flags occur when trying to purchase gas or at a convenient store inside a gas station, mostly because of the growing number of skimming operations.

    “Computers are looking at your spending, not individuals and if something falls out of balance, or out of the norm, then an alert goes out,” Lane adds.

    Because of that Lane says it’s best to play it safe and not risk getting declined at the pump, or at a restaurant while traveling.

    “It’s all about customer service,” says Lane. “You don’t to turn off a card but you want to make sure it’s a good transaction. And again, the losses are born by the financial institutions, so it’s very important.”

    Credit card companies and banks have responded by making it easier to notify them in case of any upcoming trips. You can call the number on the back of your card or visit the mobile app and leave a note.

    Doing so can save you some headaches in the busy travel season.



    Photo Credit: Bob Hansen

    0 0


    A new study says that the biggest cause of stress for children is too much homework. It topped bullying, parental expectations and self-esteem. 

    The study by the Better Sleep Council said that 74 percent of teens are stressed out from the demands of homework. The study also found that homework takes up about 15 hours a week for most teens. 

    “That’s probably the number one thing that kids talk about is the stress and anxiety that comes with too much homework," said Dr. Valerie Rock, a licensed clinical psychologist in La Jolla. "There is a lot of competition and the competitive nature of the schools. There’s pressure with the state testing and being prepared.”

    Part of the stress comes from the lack of sleep that too much homework can bring, according to the Better Sleep Council. 57 percent of teenagers said they don't get enough sleep and 67 percent said they get about five to seven hours a night, under the recommended average. 

    Rock added just this week she had a teen patient that was up until 3 in the morning trying to complete homework. 

    "It's usually with students that are in high school but we're seeing stress with kids as young as second grade," said Rock. "Kids need to have time for extracurricular activities and unstructured downtime when they can be creative." 

    Rock said that parents can help their teens through structured time management. 

    "Do time-blocking at home," said Rock. "Know extracurriculars are until this time, when you get home, we have dinner and structure time at home." 


    0 0


    Watch the full story tonight on NBC 7 at 6 p.m.

    As a parent, having your name on your child's birth certificate is very important. Without it, you can't enroll your child in school or make medical decisions on their behalf. 

    But Chrissy LaBrecque, a North Park resident, said she is being denied that right, even though she's the biological mother of her infant son. 

    NBC 7 Investigates found out about her situation because Chrissy works at NBC 7 in San Diego. 

    Her baby, named Camden, was born through in-vitro fertilization, a difficult and expensive process. 

    LaBrecque’s longtime partner, Andrea Roehl, carried and delivered him. 

     

    “The best thing about being a mom is just seeing the baby grow,” LaBrecque said. 

    LaBrecque loves her new role as Camden's mom but she said the state of California will not accept her as his parent.

     

    Camden was born at the Kaiser Permanente San Diego Medical Center. When Chrissy and Andrea filled out Camden's birth certificate at Kaiser, the couple said there was no place on the certificate where they could both be listed as his parent. 

    “We just thought she's the mother and I'm the mother. it should be fine,” Roehl said. 

    As the woman who carried and delivered Camden, Andrea Roehl was the only parent listed on the birth certificate.

    A Supreme Court ruling last year allows same-sex couples to both be listed as parents, but only if they are married. 

    LaBrecque and Roehl are not. 

    “We chose not to be married first and spend our money towards making a baby,” Roehl said. 

    The couple would find out that was a big problem. Since LaBrecque isn’t listed on Camden's birth certificate, she cannot collect Paid Family Leave or money that all new working parents are entitled to in California. 

    “I finally got somebody on the phone and they said well we need a birth certificate. You know your name has to be on it in order to get paid from the state,” LaBrecque said. 

    The couple went back to Kaiser, for help but they said hospital staff told them there was nothing they could do because the paperwork had already been sent to the state Department of Public Health, which certifies birth certificates. 

    A spokesperson for Kaiser Permanente would not agree to an on-camera interview, nor would they answer specific questions from NBC 7. 

    Jennifer Dailard, a spokesperson for Kaiser Permanente, sent NBC 7 this statement, "At Kaiser Permanente, the safety and care of our patients is paramount at all times. While we cannot comment on a specific case due to privacy laws, regarding matters related to the completion of birth certificates for individuals who are not married or in a legally registered domestic partnership, we must follow the law and specific direction of the courts in all instances." 

    NBC 7 Investigates found the staff at Kaiser were following the law, but it’s those laws that some feel are the problem. 

    “There is one area of law that has not evolved as quickly as the others and that's with respect to unmarried unregistered same-gender couples,” said Leigh Kretzschmar, a Family Law attorney. 

    Kretzschmar said that policy isn't fair because unmarried, heterosexual parents can establish paternity by simply signing what’s called a “Declaration of Paternity”. That can be done in the hospital after the child is born or soon thereafter. But unmarried, same-sex couples don't have that option. 

    “Same gender couples are forced to go get a court order. They're forced to go through an expensive process,” Kretzschmar said. “It can easily be a $3,000 to $5,000 extra step that they have to undergo whereas opposite gender couples don't have to do that.” 

    Another option is that LaBrecque could "adopt' her own biological child, which also takes times and costs money. 

    “I would have to adopt my own biological son,” LaBrecque said. “I mean it sounds absolutely insane.” 

    LaBrecque and Roehl believe it's discrimination and they want same-sex parents, transgender parents, and their children to be treated equally. 

    “I mean this is California in 2018 almost 2019,” LaBrecque said. “There should be some sort of paperwork that matches up to what heterosexual couples are signing in the hospital, the declaration of paternity that they get to sign. It is a huge emotional burden on both Andrea and me.” 

    A new proposed state law, AB-2684, would potentially fix this problem for unmarried gay and lesbian couples. The law would allow couples to be listed on their child’s birth certificate, without going to court.

    That bill could be voted on as early as January 2019 and if approved, the new law would take effect in 2020. 

    But, that’s not going to help couples like LaBrecque and Roehl. LaBrecque said she and her partner will most likely have to receive a court order from a judge, in order to be listed on Camden’s birth certificate as his parent.


    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    Chrissy LaBrecque, her partner Andrea Roehl and their son Camden.Chrissy LaBrecque, her partner Andrea Roehl and their son Camden.

    0 0


     SDFD set a Christmas tree on fire, purposefully, to show everyone how quickly unsafe festivity can turn into disaster.


    0 0


    Three men were accused of murder and one woman was charged with accessory after the fact, as the investigation into the shooting death of a Navy man on Interstate 15 continues, according to the San Diego County District Attorney’s Office.

    SW3 Curtis Adams, 21, was shot and killed on Oct. 27 after he and his girlfriend pulled over on I-15 to help who they thought was a stranded driver.

    Edson Acuna, 24, was accused of pulling the trigger, killing Adams, by prosecutors in court Wednesday.

    Edson’s brother, Brandon, 21, was arrested back in October, while his brother remained at large.

    Edson, a U.S. citizen, reportedly fled and hid south of the border until he was found and arrested by Mexican authorities Tuesday.

    Harvey Liberato, 24, was arrested on Nov. 8 in connection to the shooting as well, authorities said.

    Prosecutors said 38-year-old Susana Galvan was also in the car during the shooting, accusing her of accessory after the fact.

    The three men face life in prison without the possibility of parole due to a special circumstance of robbery.

    The men were all denied bail.

    Brandon and Edson both pleaded not guilty at their arraignments.


    0 0


    A San Diego County city is the third-safest city in California and one of the 40 safest cities in the nation, but the officers who patrol it say there’s still a lot of work to be done.

    Some people outside of Chula Vista would be shocked to learn that it’s one of the safest cities in the state.

    Snooky Rico owns Rico’s on Third and says the Chula Vista Police Department calls her more often than she calls them.

    “We’ve never had any issues, to be honest with you,” Rico said.

    Outsiders may think her city isn’t safe but it’s not true, according to a new report from WalletHub.

    “I always take it a little bit personal because I know it’s not true,” she said.

    WalletHub says Chula Vista is the third-safest city in California and 39th-safest in the United States.

    CVPD Captain Phil Collum says the ranking is complimentary of the city’s law enforcement and its residents.

    “I believe it reflects really well on the entire community because the police doesn’t do this alone,” Captain Collum said.

    Collum says he’s proud of the ranking, but he’s not ready to rest on his laurels.

    “Our police department has not been able to meet our standards for responding to crimes in a rapid manner,” he admitted.

    Though the city is safe, Collum says the department doesn’t have enough officers to quickly respond to all of its calls, or to follow through with investigations.

    The city is working on easing that burden. More tax money is earmarked to hire more than 30 officers over the next five years.


    0 0


    A 7-year-old boy who was hit by a car while looking at holiday lights with his family in Ocean Beach was released from the hospital Wednesday but still has a long recovery ahead.

    Caleb De Leon was walking on the north side of Newport Avenue after 6 p.m. Monday when he stepped off the curb and was hit. Despite his injuries, He still had the strength to crawl to the side of the road.

    "I saw him crawling over to the car that was parked in front of me and he just looked up at me and said "I'm OK, thank the lord, I'm OK," Caleb's father Daniel said.

    Daniel said he ran to Caleb and saw a bone in his leg sticking out through his skin.

    "I look down and see the tibia is sticking out of his leg," Daniel said. "I remember falling to my knees and holding his face so he wouldn't look down. I told him 'You're amazing, you're a champion, you're going to get through this.'"

    Caleb, who is visiting with family from Arkansas, now has a metal bar and several pins holding his leg bone together. His new hardware and healing bones are wrapping up in a bright blue cast.

    He'll have plenty of physical therapy along his road to recovery, and the team at Rady Children's Hospital is putting him in contact with specialists in his home state.

    Daniel said the injury also took a toll on Caleb's 9-year-old brother who saw the whole thing happen.

    "He's watching his brother and he saw the injuries, it just traumatized him," Daniel said.

    Caleb and his brother will see a counselor, their father said.

    The driver of the car that hit Caleb stayed at the scene.

    The San Diego Police Traffic Division is investigating the incident but preliminary information indicates the driver was not under the influence of alcohol at the time of the collision.


    0 0


    Pacific Beach business owners say homeless people are setting up camp on their rooftops and claim police aren’t doing enough to combat the problem.

    Mark Marino, owner of Marino’s Italian Food restaurant off Garnet Avenue, says homeless target low buildings like his which are easy to climb up. He said a homeless couple has staked claim to his rooftop.

    Marino says he’s kicked them off of his roof several times, but each time they return at night.

    "It's just constant. Like I said, I know their names. ‘Alright, you guys get out of here,’ you know, that sort of thing,’ he said.

    He said he reports the problem to police and officers have come and told the offenders to leave at least five times, but he says the roof dwellers are never cited or arrested because one thing or another he didn't have in place.

    "Technically, if you don't have the trespassing signs, you don't have the letter of agency, then it's not trespassing,” he said. “Yet they're on the property.”

    Business owners at a strip mall down the street from Marino’s restaurant say they've been dealing with the same thing. It’s not a surprise to Marino, who says it’s a growing trend in the neighborhood.

    "If you start looking at flat roofs, you might see clothes hanging out to dry, you'll see stuff, I see it all over P.B.,” he said.

    He says cleaning up after the people who live on his roof has become a real chore.

    NBC 7 reached out to the San Diego Police Department for information on Marino’s case and officers said Marino did have proper paperwork on file. However, when they returned to his business the couple had moved above a vacant nosiness next door which isn’t considered private property.

    SDPD said it has been asking business owners to be vigilant, and to call them if they spot homeless encampments on rooftops.


older | 1 | .... | 2635 | 2636 | (Page 2637) | 2638 | 2639 | .... | 2672 | newer