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    Hundreds of residents and dozens of sailors came out to an annual turkey giveaway in National City in preparation for Thanksgiving.

    The mayor of National City, Ron Morrison, hosts the yearly event. This Tuesday marked its 10th year.

    “I think it’s amazing that everybody can come together like this and just be one big, happy family for this thanksgiving season,” Petty Officer 1st Class Sarah Alvarez told NBC 7.

    Alvarez, who has served at the Southwest Regional Maintenance Center (SRMC) in Barrio Logan for the past three years, said she was in line for a friend.

    “I’m here to get a turkey for one of my sailors who cannot,” she said. “Just having some hard times, so I want to make sure that this sailor has a good Thanksgiving.”

    Roughly 680 people were in line for the Thanksgiving bird and other holiday sides.

    “These are the ones we can help right now, and these are the ones we’re going to help,” Morrison told NBC 7. “That’s just the reality of our world today.”

    Most of the families were preselected for the free food through schools and the military.

    “It’s great,” said Marisela Baltazar, an electrician’s mate at SRMC, who was getting a turkey for herself. “Everybody gets together to help out people in need.”

    Morrison, alongside nearly 10 donors, bought and passed out the free meals to those who needed it.


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    The San Diego County District Attorney’s Office is reopening the investigation into the death of a Solana Beach man who was allegedly beaten to death in the hallway of his home.

    The District Attorney’s Office’s decision comes just one week after NBC 7 Investigates reported on George Sloss’s death.

    “We are happy to hear the District Attorney’s Office will reopen my brother’s case,” said Mary Ann Kortemeier, Sloss’ sister.

    “Me and my five siblings, as well as George’s two daughters, are hopeful that justice will finally be served.”

    Sloss’ fiancè Mendy Cox told NBC 7 Investigates that she and Sloss heard a knock on their door on May 13. Cox stayed on the couch while Sloss answered the front door.

    At the door was L. Byron Culver III, a direct descendant of the Culver family, known for farming much of what is present-day Irvine, and the namesake for one of that city’s busiest roads. According to the police report and medical examiner’s report obtained by NBC 7 Investigates, Culver had lent $62,000 to Sloss several years ago. Culver allegedly showed up that night in May to collect a payment.

    “George says, ‘Hey buddy, how are you?’” Cox told NBC 7 Investigates. “And, he says, ‘Not good.’ I could literally hear [Culver] breathing heavy, like really hard. George told him to calm down, everything will be ok.”

    She said she heard Culver respond, “No, no, it’s not ok. I just want to hit you in your [expletive] face.”

    Not long after Cox said she heard two loud thuds and she felt the couch she was sitting on the move.

    Cox says Culver punched Sloss in the face. The blow allegedly knocked him off his feet, his head hitting the corner of a wooden table in the couple’s living room. Cox said she stood up and saw Culver kick Sloss in the groin as he lay bleeding and unconscious on the floor.

    Cox managed to chase Culver out of the couple’s condo as her fiancè lay in a pool of his own blood but not before Cox says Culver kicked her as she pushed him toward the front door.

    “There was just this large pool of blood,” Cox said. “I’ve seen a lot but never, ever in my life have I felt this way. I slid down on my knees to try and stop the bleeding. I feel the back of his head and that’s when I get sick.”

    Sloss was treated for a Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Sheriff’s deputies arrested Culver for felony assault. Culver later bailed out of jail.

    Meanwhile, Cox remained at the hospital as Sloss lay in a coma.

    “The doctor told me,” Cox said, “that [Sloss] had a turn for the worse and that he was not likely to make it through the day.”

    He died four days later.

    Soon after Sloss had died Cox learned that the District Attorney’s Office had declined to prosecute Culver.

    Cox and Sloss’ two daughters from a previous relationship filed separate wrongful death lawsuits in hopes of compelling county attorneys to prosecute Culver.

    Now, the District Attorney’s Office has confirmed they will be giving the case another look. The decision is welcome news for Sloss’ family. 

    NBC 7 Investigates reached out to Culver’s attorney but he did not respond.


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    The City of Encinitas just hit a second roadblock on a controversial development project along Highway 101.

    Upset neighbors first sued the city, and now they’ve filed suit against the Coastal Commission for approving the plan that calls for thinning a stretch of the highway from four to two lanes in favor of a bike lane, additional parking, a series of roundabouts and crosswalks.

    “I can't believe it,” Escondido resident Bill Sparks said. “That doesn't make any sense to me.”

    The city says the Leucadia Streetscape Program is going to keep drivers, cyclists and pedestrians safe along a 2.5-mile stretch of Highway 101 near Leucadia Boulevard,

    The 101 is the main way for residents along the coast to enter and leave their neighborhood and they drivers worry how much worse traffic will be after the project cuts the highway in half.

    La Costa resident Kira Harland, a supporter of the plan, says the safety of cyclists and pedestrians outweighs the concerns about possible worsened traffic.

    “Almost every single time I’m in the right lane there's a biker I have to swerve around. Almost every single time,” she said. “I just think the amount of traffic jam that happens here is not as big of a deal as the safety of people biking.”

    Nearby business owner Patty Kattus worries the project will hurt businesses like hers that line the highway. She says traffic is bad enough as it is.

    “I’ve seen it stretch all the way into Carlsbad,” she said.

    She said she’s also seen people parked along the shoulder of the highway wait up to 15 minutes just so they can back out and drive away.

    She does acknowledge, however, that the project addresses many of the public safety concerns. She knows something has to change, but still isn’t quite sure the project is the answer.

    An attorney for the resident group filing the lawsuits says there is currently no court date set, and fears a resolution will take months.

    The mayor of Encinitas, the City Council, and the Coastal Commission would not comment on the lawsuits.

    The city expects to discuss funding for the project at a meeting scheduled for March 2019.


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    Many people have driven through a sobriety or DUI checkpoint, or at the very least know about them. San Diego County has staged hundreds of checkpoints over the last few years and spent millions of dollars to staff them. 

    But NBC 7 Investigates wanted to know what kind of results they produced. And why some feel they need to be eliminated completely. We filed public record requests with every law enforcement agency in San Diego County for statistics on DUI checkpoints. 

    Data collected by NBC 7 Investigates found San Diego Police have had the most checkpoints in the County. 

    On a Friday night in October, San Diego Police staged a DUI checkpoint on Ingraham Street in Pacific Beach. 

    Through the night, more than 660 vehicles went through the checkpoint, resulting in 11 drivers being arrested for driving under the influence. 

    That's higher than usual for San Diego Police. After analyzing the department’s checkpoint statistics, NBC 7 Investigates found on average, San Diego Police make eight arrests per checkpoint. 

    Across San Diego County, since 2012, more than 500,000 drivers have passed through checkpoints, resulting in 2,700 drivers arrested at checkpoints. That's only 3-percent of drivers who went through them. 

    “The amount of money that is spent and quite frankly wasted on these DUI checkpoints, there's been no provable correlation at all as to the deterrent effect that they have,” said DUI Attorney Cole Casey. 

    Casey said checkpoints are mostly money makers, especially for law enforcement agencies, which catch mostly unlicensed drivers, while looking for drunk drivers. 

    “It makes law enforcement a lot of money and makes jails a lot of money and makes probation a lot of money,” Casey said. 

    A lot of money is spent to staff sobriety checkpoints. Records show San Diego Police spent $2.3 million on DUI checkpoints since 2012. A breakdown of that money shows that San Diego Police spent more than $1,500 for every person arrested for DUI during their checkpoints.

    San Diego Police Officer John Perdue said it’s worth the price. “I think it's still a good means for us to do that.” 

    The money used to staff checkpoints comes from grants issued by the Office of Traffic Safety (OTS). Since 2014, the OTS issued nearly $31-million dollars in grants to San Diego County law enforcement agencies. 

    Perdue said it takes a lot of officers to put on the checkpoints and they're all paid overtime through OTS funding. Still, he said, “It's hard to say that they (DUI checkpoints) are a deterrent.” 

    But Perdue said making DUI arrests is not the goal. 

    “It's a common belief that checkpoints, we are out to arrest people. Believe it or not, the primary reason for the checkpoint is actually education.” Perdue said. 

    Instead of checkpoints, which cause traffic and frustration for drivers, Casey believes more time should be spent on DUI Saturation Patrols, where trained officers look for people driving impaired. 

    Perdue said only a fraction of the money they receive from the OTS is used for DUI checkpoints. He said it's also spent on saturation patrols, distracted driving enforcement, and pedestrian safety. 

    The number of citations handed out at checkpoints is double the number of arrests, more than 5,200 issued in the last six years. The majority of those citations are for driving without or on a suspended license. 

    Perdue said despite the low percentage of DUI arrests during the checkpoints, he believes they are worth the time and money. 

    “I know it sounds a little cliché, but if we can reach just a handful of people then it is ultimately worth it.”


    San Diego Police running a sobriety checkpoint on Ingraham Street in Pacific Beach.San Diego Police running a sobriety checkpoint on Ingraham Street in Pacific Beach.

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    A hung jury mistrial has been declared in the case of a 22-year-old man accused of murdering a young woman when she went out for a run in her Queens neighborhood more than two years ago. 

    A family member of Vetrano could be heard saying "Oh, my God" in the courtroom as the mistrial of Chanel Lewis was declared. 

    Jurors said they were split and that it didn't seem as though they would make progress one way or another by deliberating any further. 

    The judge agreed, saying that although it had been only a day and a half, it seemed as though the jury had exhausted all routes. 

    Jury deliberations started Monday and continued into Tuesday night. The jury, comprised of seven and five men, asked to review evidence like pictures of Vetrano's neck injuries and a photo of her necklace, photos of the autopsy, photos of the running trail, and Lewis' web searches. They also asked to rewatch Lewis' confession tape. 

    The judge read back 75-page testimony from the medical examiner regarding DNA evidence. 

    A control hearing about what happens next is scheduled for Jan. 22.

    Lewis had pleaded not guilty to murder and sexual abuse charges in the Aug. 2, 2016 death of 30-year-old Karina Vetrano. He was 20 when he allegedly sexually assaulted and strangled Vetrano, abandoning her body in the marsh. 

    Vetrano had gone out for her usual run early that evening. She never came home. Her father, Phil Vetrano, was among the group that found her body in Howard Beach's Spring Creek Park hours after she was reported missing. 

    Phil Vetrano broke down on the stand as he testified about the horror. 

    “I let out this sound that I — that I never made before or since. It was — I don’t know. It was like a wail,” he recalled. “And then I screamed, ‘My baby, my baby.’”

    Lewis, who was 20 when he allegedly sexually assaulted and strangled Vetrano, was arrested in the killing about six months after her death. Prosecutors said he was connected to the case via DNA evidence obtained from underneath Vetrano's fingernails. The medical examiner had said she fought for her life. 

    In a confession tape played during the trial last week, Lewis was heard saying he was angry about the loud music his neighbor had been playing when he encountered Vetrano jogging on the park trail. 

    “While you were in the park, did something happen?” Assistant District Attorney Peter McCormack asks Lewis on the tape, which is dated Feb. 5, 2017.

    “Yes,” Lewis replied.

    Lewis then admits that he “got angry and started hitting [Vetrano]” in the face and mouth, video shows.

    At some point during the attack, Vetrano’s tooth broke, he says, adding that Vetrano’s face ended up in a pool of water.

    Lewis also admits to putting his hands around Vetrano’s neck and hitting her for about five minutes, before dragging her “somewhere off the pathway.”

    Her clothing was “pulled off,” but Lewis denies sexually assaulting her.

    Lewis' defense lawyers claimed in closing arguments that a confession was obtained under duress and the evidence in the case was weak.

    They said the DNA found on the Vetrano's body was minuscule, and that police were eager to make an arrest six months after her body was found.

    "This is a rush to judgment," one of Lewis' lawyers said.

    The defense also claimed there was sloppy police work, starting with the crime scene when Vetrano's father lifted up and hugged her lifeless body when he found her. He broke down on the stand as he testified about the horror last week.

    The defense said because of that, "The crime scene became corrupted for the first time. You can't blame Mr. Vetrano for what he did. He did what any dad would do."

    They said the entire case was based on a rush to judgment and that prosecutors lacked the burden of proof.



    Photo Credit: News 4
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    A California sheriff says the list of names of those unaccounted for after a deadly wildfire has increased to 870.

    Butte County Sheriff Kory Honea says the additional 171 names came from a backlog of voicemails that detectives worked through Tuesday.

    Authorities stressed that many of the people on the list may be safe and unaware they have been reported missing.

    Honea says two more sets of human remains were found Tuesday, bringing the total number killed in the so-called Camp Fire to 81.

    The blaze that started Nov. 8 leveled Paradise, destroying more than 13,000 homes. Fire officials said the wildfire has torched 152,250 acres and is 75 percent contained.



    Photo Credit: Sudhin Thanawala/AP

    In this Nov. 18, 2018 file photo, volunteer members of an El Dorado County search and rescue team search the ruins of a home, looking for human remains, in Paradise, Calif., following a wildfire.In this Nov. 18, 2018 file photo, volunteer members of an El Dorado County search and rescue team search the ruins of a home, looking for human remains, in Paradise, Calif., following a wildfire.

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    The devastation caused by the tragic death of a father of six last year still pains his family one year later.

    Omar Moreno was riding his motorcycle from Harbor Drive onto Vestra Street a week before Thanksgiving 2017 when he was hit by a semi-truck and killed

    “Not having him with us here is the worst tragedy we have had in our family," Omar’s sister Mercy Figueroa told NBC 7. Figueroa described her brother as one of a kind. A good father, son, brother, and friend.

    After his death, the community rallied around the family by donating money to help with Omar’s funeral expenses. Figueroa took time to thank everyone who supported them, and continues to help them, at a vigil held Tuesday in her brother's memory.

    Following his death, Omar's widow Maria asked the community for help as she struggled to give the beloved father a proper burial while also taking care of their children.

    Omar and Maria had been married for 16 years. She described Omar as a thoughtful husband and great father who was the primary breadwinner of the family, working hard to support them.

    He was employed at NASSCO for 15 years. His oldest daughter, Ashli Moreno, said it was a job he loved.

    Omar's mother and sister say they would like to return to the memorial near the site of the crash every year to remember him.

    Since her brother’s death, she hasn’t heard much from her sister-in-law or her nieces and nephews.  Moreno’s wife and children did not show up to today’s vigil.  His mother and sister say they would like to return to this memorial every year to remember Omar.


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    Lemon Grove is getting tough on tobacco sales in an effort to protect children.

    City Councilmembers Tuesday night discussed the details of a Tobacco Retail Licensing Ordinance that would give them more enforcement power at the city level to try and make sure stores don’t sell tobacco to people under 21.

    “We need to get it under control here," said Dana Stevens, the head of the Community Action Service Advocacy (CASA).

    CASA’s undercover data collection over the past three years found more than 30 percent of tobacco retailers in Lemon Grove illegally sold tobacco products to people under 21.

    Some didn't even ask for identification as required by law.

    “If we can just keep people from selling tobacco to kids we can offer those kids a better future,” Stevens said.

    Under the new ordinance, any retailer selling tobacco must have a valid Tobacco Retailer License. The yearly fee for the license would be $250, according to early discussions.

    Part of the money would be used to fund the San Diego County Sheriff’s Department’s store inspections. Stores already pay a license fee to the state, which also has an enforcement arm.

    Revenue will also be used to educate retailers about the dangers of underage smoking.

    “This allows that rigorous and consistent compliance monitoring to occur at the local level,” Stevens said of the ordinance.

    "At least they will be visited once a year on that compliance monitoring and that's more than typically occurs in a community," he added.

    In a statement, the California Fuels and Convenience Alliance which represents around 300 gas stations across the state noted businesses would be "severely affected" by the ordinance. The statement also noted the industry already complies with changing federal and state law, while conducting internal sting operations and building successful prevention policies such as the WeCard Program

    Stores will start paying the fee in December 2019 if the ordinance passes.

    The council is proposing suspending or revoking a store’s license if three violations happen within three years. Discounts are also being considered for sores that don’t commit violations.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images/Science Photo Libra, File

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    Pay close attention while prepping your turkey and exercise extreme care when setting up your holiday decorations. Statistically, you'll be playing with fire.

    There are more in-home fires during the holiday season than at any other time of the year, according to data from the National Fire Protection Association. Thanksgiving is the single worst day for fires, NBC News reported.

    An estimated 2,090 home fires were reported to fire departments around the United States on Thanksgiving 2016, according to the association. That’s more than twice the daily average for the rest of the year. Of the Thanksgiving fires, three-quarters were cooking-related. On average, Thanksgiving fires killed five people, injured 25 and caused $19 million in property loss from 2014 to 2016, according to the U.S. Fire Administration. 

    Distractions are the main cause of cooking fires, according to the NFPA, adding that hosts are inclined to talk to guests instead of managing the kitchen at all times. To stay safe during the holidays, experts suggest keeping combustible items like aprons and towels away from flames, installing or checking smoke and carbon monoxide detectors and paying attention while cooking.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    Be careful when making Thanksgiving dinner this year.Be careful when making Thanksgiving dinner this year.

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    Big balloons, colorful floats and famous stars will fill the streets of New York City Thursday for the 92nd annual Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade.

    Hosted on the national holiday by Savannah Guthrie, Hoda Kotb and Al Roker, the three-hour event will air at 9 a.m. in all time zones. An encore presentation will air at 2 p.m.

    Watch the parade live online Thursday by clicking here and logging in with your TV provider.

    Special musical guests are expected to include Barenaked Ladies, John Legend, Leona Lewis, Martina McBride, Rita Ora, Pentatonix, the cast and muppets of "Sesame Street" and Diana Ross and her family.

    Also watch for an expected performance by the Radio City Rockettes, as well as appearances from beloved balloons including Charlie Brown, Olaf, the Pillsbury Doughboy and the Elf on the Shelf.



    Photo Credit: Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images, File

    This Nov. 23, 2017, file photo shows the 91st annual Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City.This Nov. 23, 2017, file photo shows the 91st annual Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City.

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    San Diego County is home to many sweeping, scenic ocean views -- one more beautiful than the next.

    Photo Credit: Monica Garske

    Downtown San Diego’s gorgeous skyline and views of the San Diego Bay are on full display along the Embarcadero. The waterfront zone is filled with maritime history, including the USS Midway Museum, the fishing harbor and the Maritime Museum of San Diego, home of the famous Star of India. A walk along the scenic Embarcadero will remind you why this is truly America’s Finest City.Downtown San Diego’s gorgeous skyline and views of the San Diego Bay are on full display along the Embarcadero. The waterfront zone is filled with maritime history, including the USS Midway Museum, the fishing harbor and the Maritime Museum of San Diego, home of the famous Star of India. A walk along the scenic Embarcadero will remind you why this is truly America’s Finest City.

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    A 23-year-old Florida woman was captured on police body camera video dropping a baby on its head, fracturing the infant's skull, while running away from police.

    Kayla Morgan was arrested Monday and charged with aggravated child abuse and resisting arrest. 

    Marion County sheriff’s deputies were called after witnesses reported seeing a woman darting in and out of traffic near Silver Springs while holding an infant, according to NBC affiliate WESH-TV.

    When deputies approached Morgan, she could be seen running away before dropping the infant head first on the ground. Video shows a bystander rushing to help the child and handing the baby over to officers.  

    The baby was taken to the hospital with a fractured skull, deputies said. It was not immeditaley clear if Morgan was the baby's mother. Officials said the baby is expected to recover. 

    Morgan was taken to an area hospital after telling deputies she had been taking psychoactive drugs, including methamphetamine and the street drug "Molly," over the last three days.

    She told investigators she thought "a monster was trying to suck her blood," according to WESH.

    It was not immediately clear if Morgan had an attorney.



    Photo Credit: Marion County Sheriff's Office

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    The second person to die of flu-related illness in San Diego County this season was a 70-year-old woman, health officials reported Wednesday.

    The woman lived in San Diego and died on Nov. 14, according to the County Health and Human Services Agency. 

    She had underlying medical conditions, officials said. They said it was not known if the woman had received a current flu vaccination. 

    “This is a continued reminder that influenza can be deadly, especially for the elderly, young children and those with existing chronic illnesses,” said Wilma Wooten, M.D., M.P.H., County public health officer. “Vaccination is the best protection against influenza.”

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that everyone 6 months and older get a flu shot every year. The vaccine is safe and effective. It takes two weeks for immunity to develop.

    In San Diego County, 342 residents died of flu-related causes in the 2017 to 2018 flu season.

    The first flu death of the season was reported on Nov. 2 when a 52-year-old woman died of underlying medical conditions.

    At this time last year, the county had reported four deaths tied to influenza. 

    No other information was available.

    Please refresh this page for updates on this story. Details may change as more information becomes available.



    Photo Credit: NBC 7

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    Eater San Diego shares the top stories of the week from San Diego’s food and drink scene, including a look at a buzzy new North County restaurant and big coffee news.

    Popular DC-Based Asian Restaurant Opens in Encinitas
    Chiko, a breakout hit from Washington, D.C., has debuted on Highway 101 in Encinitas. The casual eatery serves a menu rooted in Chinese and Korean cuisine cooked with creative license; signature dishes include "orange-ish chicken" and soy-glazed chopped brisket.

    Blue Bottle Coffee Launching in San Diego
    Industry giant Blue Bottle is coming to San Diego as part of its continuing global expansion. The Northern California-based company will be bringing a café to the new One Paseo development in Carmel Valley and has plans to also open a branch in downtown San Diego.

    Little Italy's Harumama Expands to Carlsbad
    Harumama's Instagram-worthy steamed buns, shaped like adorable animals and cute movie characters, are now available in Carlsbad. An outlet of the Little Italy eatery just opened next to Blue Ocean Robata & Sushi Bar and is also serving ramen, sushi, and other Asian-inspired dishes.

    LA's Zinqué’ Heads for Little Italy
    Zinqué Restaurant & Wine Bar, which has locations in Venice, West Hollywood, and Newport Beach, is opening an outpost in Little Italy's new AV8 building. The European-style eatery will share the ground-floor with SuperNatural Sandwiches and Bobboi Gelato.

    Holiday Pop-Ups Coming to Local Bars
    Hospitality group CH Projects is giving a festive makeover to some of its well-known bars. Starting this weekend, Polite Provisions will become a winter wonderland while Craft & Commerce and False Idol get Dr. Seuss-themed decorations, and Soda & Swine in Liberty Station preps to host Santa. 

    [[347245932,C]]



    Photo Credit: Haley Hill
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    Chiko serves a menu rooted in Chinese and Korean cuisine cooked with creative license.Chiko serves a menu rooted in Chinese and Korean cuisine cooked with creative license.

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    Water, hops, grain and yeast.

    Pulkit Agrawal became familiar with beer’s four main components while working for San Diego’s largest brewery, Ballast Point. Serving as a process engineer for just over two years, he helped Ballast point manage its packaging and canning systems.

    Agrawal took his experience with Ballast Point in October of 2017 to create a new company, the 5th Ingredient. He contends data is a key part of the equation for a good brew.

    “We’re helping breweries track data from grain to glass,” he said. “If all of a sudden between two batches another flavor comes out, something more buttery or apple-y, you can now start pinpointing it because you’re looking at the entire story with the push of a button.”

    Paper Logs

    Right now, many microbreweries use an old-fashioned system of paper logs attached to tanks and excel sheets to track the process. A few software competitors exist, including OrchestratedBeer and Ekos Brewmaster, but Agrawal said their systems were more accounting-based, where the 5th Ingredient is more focused on the brewing process.

    “It’s very much chemistry- and physics-based. You can input the recipe into the system,” Agrawal said. “That’s what appealed to our clientele.”

    Agrawal’s system tracks more than 100 data points across the brewing, packaging, warehousing and inventory processes. For example, a brewer could track the amount of grain that went into a particular beer, or detect if it is taking longer than usual to brew.

    Efficiencies Count

    In a city with more than 150 breweries, those efficiencies count.

    “If you don’t make good beer, it’s really easy to go next door and get somebody else’s beer,” Agrawal said. “If you are not maintaining costs and increasing efficiency, you’re going to go out of business.”

    The 5th Ingredient’s software is sold as a service, with the price scaled depending on the size of the brewer. So far, all of its customers are craft breweries in Southern California, producing between 200 and 7,000 barrels per year. They include San Diego-based Protector Brewery and Latchkey Brewing Co., and Smog City Brewing Co. in Los Angeles.

    Protector, an organic microbrewery, was one of the 5th Ingredient’s first customers. Co-founder Sean Haggerty said the software allows him to track information about each batch of beer on his phone, including how many batches of beer they can brew in one day, how much grain is in inventory after a shipment, and IBU levels (International Bitterness Units).

    “Last year they were starting up this idea. There are a lot of competitors out there like Ekos, but I believe in Pulkit,” Haggerty said. “When you brew a beer, consistency is the number one priority. We get to see the batch history and make sure we’re brewing the best beer possible.”

    First Hire

    Agrawal’s work with Protector Brewing led to his first hire. Protector co-founder Ryan Allis joined the software company as its chief operating officer in June.

    With his background in sales, distribution and engineering, Allis helped redesign the front end of Agrawal’s application to make it more user-friendly.

    Next, the 5th Ingredient hopes to scale to breweries between 40,000 and 100,000 barrels per year. For context, Ballast Point brews about 375,000 barrels per year, while Green Flash brews about 91,000. The 5th Ingredient is considering raising funds in early 2019, likely a friends and family round, to hire another software developer. But Agrawal said the goal has always been to grow the company organically.

    “I’m excited to see where they go,” Haggerty said. “As an entrepreneur, when someone has a spark in their eye and want to do something big, those guys at the 5th Ingredient are hungry for success.”



    Photo Credit: 5th Ingredient
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    The 5th Ingredient’s platform allows brewers to track every step of the brewing process, and compare attributes between batches, such as a beer’s gravity.The 5th Ingredient’s platform allows brewers to track every step of the brewing process, and compare attributes between batches, such as a beer’s gravity.

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    Black Friday? More like Wax Friday: On Nov. 23, hundreds of worldwide independent record shops that participate in Record Store Day (RSD) -- the annual April vinyl-centric shopping event -- will also offer exclusive Black Friday titles.

    The upcoming national shopping holiday will feature roughly about one-third of the number of releases the official RSD event usually offers, but that’s not to say plenty of sought-after titles won’t be up for grabs at independent record stores.

    This year, A Perfect Circle, Chris Cornell, the Flaming Lips, G-Eazy, Guns N’ Roses, Jimi Hendrix, Madonna, Paul McCartney, Outkast, Phish, Rage Against the Machine, Ramones, the Smashing Pumpkins, Taylor Swift, U2 and Frank Zappa (among many others) get in on the action with either RSD Black Friday exclusives or "RSD First" releases. For a full list of selections, visit the official Record Store Day website here.

    As expected, many of the San Diego shops that typically participate in RSD are gearing up for the Black Friday event -- as well as the following day, Small Business Saturday (which is always a good reminder to shop local when possible). Here's the SoundDiego guide to what's going down.

    Participating 2018 RSD Black Friday San Diego shops (listed alphabetically) 

    Cow Records: 10 a.m.-9 p.m. 5040 Newport Ave., Ocean Beach.

    FeeLIT Records: 10 a.m.-8 p.m. In-store promotions on deck along with all-vinyl DJ sets, live performances and a storewide sale. Also hosting “Skratch Friday” -- an open Scratch Session with a portable turntable powered by Bumpboxx SoCal from 2-5 p.m. 909 E St., East Village.

    Folk Arts Rare Records: 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Will be “breaking out some serious gems for Small Business Saturday,” and the store’s published a list online of all the titles they’ll definitely have in stock on RSD Black Friday right here. 3072 El Cajon Blvd., North Park. 

    Lou's Records: 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Numbers handed out to those in line at 9 a.m. 434 N. Coast Highway 101, Encinitas.

    M-Theory Records: 10 a.m.-8 p.m. DJ sets by Mark Quark (Moonshake), Vincent (Rhythm Nation) and special guests. Free pizza from Lefty’s. 827 W. Washington St., Mission Hills.

    Normal Records: 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Here’s a handy list of all the titles they’ll have at least one copy of. 4201 30th St., North Park. 

    Re-Animated Records: 7 a.m.-7 p.m. First few customers in line will receive a free “Re-Animated RSD Black Friday Barf Bag” with mysterious goodies. Free snacks and drinks, and 20 percent off storewide (excluding RSD titles). 8320 La Mesa Blvd., La Mesa.

    Record City: 11 a.m.-7 p.m. 3757 Sixth Ave., Hillcrest.

    Spin Records: 10 a.m.-10 p.m. 370 Grand Ave., Carlsbad.

    Taang! Records: 11 a.m.-9 p.m. 3830 Fifth Ave., Hillcrest.

    Of course, not every participating record shop will be carrying all the titles scheduled to be released for RSD Black Friday. Quantities are spread out the world over and often shops don't know what they'll be receiving until the shipments show up at their door. Such is the beauty of first come, first served! Happy diggin', folks.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    Local record shops get in on Record Store Day's annual Black Friday event Nov. 23.Local record shops get in on Record Store Day's annual Black Friday event Nov. 23.

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    Two cars were struck by large rocks while crossing Coronado Bridge Wednesday morning, according to California Highway Patrol. 

    A driver was traveling westbound towards Coronado Island when a large rock struck his Nissan sedan, smashing the windshield. 

    A car traveling eastbound was then hit by several rocks, which damaged the body of the car and cracked the windshield in several places. 

    One driver was taken to the hospital with a chest injury. His injuries did not appear to be life-threatening, CHP said. 

    It was not clear what caused the rocks to strike the cars but investigators would be looking for surveillance cameras to determine if the rocks were thrown, CHP said.

    In June, several cars struck cement blocks that were lying on Interstate 8 in El Cajon. CHP said it appeared, in that case, a person was placing them in the roadway. 

    There is no indication that the rocks on the Coronado Bridge are connected. 

    No other information was available.

    Please refresh this page for updates on this story. Details may change as more information becomes available.


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  • 11/21/18--13:25: Why LAX Traffic is the Worst

  • Getting to Los Angeles International Airport to pick someone up or make a drop-off is only part of what's often a frustration-filled traffic battle, especially during the holidays.

    Keep in mind that traffic apps like Waze or Google Maps will only get you to the airport entrance, where the real challenge begins -- navigating the increasingly infamous horseshoe-shaped road that takes drivers on a stop-and-go crawl to parking areas and pick-up and drop-off points at each terminal.

    The I-Team found that the number of vehicles entering LAX has skyrocketed over the last two years, due in large part to Uber and Lyft services that the city once hoped would ease congestion. There was an increase of 10 million vehicles at LAX from 2012 to 2017, much of it starting in 2015 when the city allowed ride-sharing services to operate at the airport.

    [[500966671,C]]

    Last year, LAX granted Lyft and Uber drivers permission to pick up a new passenger as soon as they dropped someone off, which means they can stay in the central terminal area without going to a lot off airport property to wait for their next ride request. 

    Rideshare use is generating serious revenue for the airport. Uber and Lyft pay $4 each time a driver enters the Central Terminal Area. Profits amounted to $9 million in the 2016 fiscal year. This year, it's multiplied near five times to $44.3 million.

    [[500966651,C]]

    LAX officials declined an on-camera interview with NBC4, but said in a statement that the money goes to the airport's general fund, which is used to support day-to-day operations. They said the airport is working with ride-share companies to find ways to reduce congestion.

    Upcoming renovations included an automated people-moved, but that won't be ready for at least five years. 

    [[500967531, C]]



    Photo Credit: Getty Images
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    Traffic fills arrival and departure lanes at LAX as people travel to Thanksgiving holiday destinations on November 26, 2014 in Los Angeles, California.Traffic fills arrival and departure lanes at LAX as people travel to Thanksgiving holiday destinations on November 26, 2014 in Los Angeles, California.

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    TSA is estimating some 25 million people will travel for the Thanksgiving holiday.

    That means a lot of checked bags, and a lot of chances of something going wrong. So what happens if your bags are lost or delayed?

    That's why some passengers carryon luggage rather than checking it.

    This past summer, nearly half a million bags were reported lost or delayed, according to the Department of Transportation.

    But if you check bags, and they're lost or delayed, you have rights.

    • For delayed bags, airlines will pay reasonable expenses -- like toiletries and clothing - until you get your bag.
    • For lost bags, airlines will reimburse the depreciated value of your belongings - up to $3,500.
    • If your bags are delayed, be sure to keep all your expense receipts.
    • For both lost and delayed bags, be sure to ask the airline about the deadline to file a claim. And request a refund for your baggage fees.

     



      Photo Credit: Getty Images

      MIAMI, FL - DECEMBER 19: People wait in line to check luggage at the ABC Charters American Airlines flight to Havana, Cuba at Miami International Airport on December 19, 2014 in Miami, Florida. U.S. President Barack Obama announced a relaxation in the Cuban policy which may mean more travel between the United States and Cuba. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)MIAMI, FL - DECEMBER 19: People wait in line to check luggage at the ABC Charters American Airlines flight to Havana, Cuba at Miami International Airport on December 19, 2014 in Miami, Florida. U.S. President Barack Obama announced a relaxation in the Cuban policy which may mean more travel between the United States and Cuba. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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      A homicide investigation was launched Wednesday morning after a man was found dead with a gunshot wound near a park in Oceanside.

      Police were called to Calle Montecito, near Libby Lake Park, at about 3 a.m. Wednesday after a report of gunshots, the Oceanside Police Department said. 

      When officers arrived, a man in his 20s was found dead in the street. He appeared to have a gunshot wound, prompting police to launch a homicide investigation, the OPD said. 

      No suspects have been identified.

      Detectives had cordoned off part of Calle Montecito as they continued their investigation. Police remained on scene at 7 a.m. 

      OPD said the shooting may have been gang-related but the investigation is ongoing. 

      One resident who lives nearby said she was warned about dangers at the Libby Lake Park. 

      "I heard about Libby Lake being kind of just scary and ‘watch out for shootings and gang violence’ but this is the first since I’ve moved in, in like a couple months, that I’ve seen something," Kelsey Delee said.

      No other information was available.

      Please refresh this page for updates on this story. Details may change as more information becomes available.


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