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    A 10-year-old girl was hit by a car in a Petco parking lot Wednesday in Rancho San Diego, according to the San Diego Sheriff’s Department.

    The girl’s parent quickly called 911 and said the girl was walking in the parking lot before she was struck, the California Highway Patrol said.

    The incident occurred on Jamacha Road just before 4:30 p.m.

    Deputies said the 10-year-old received minor injuries.

    No other information was available at this time.



    Photo Credit: Moment Editorial/Getty Images

    Petco store signPetco store sign

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    Sixteen years after a jury sentenced David Westerfield to death for the murder of 7-year-old Danielle van Dam, the state Supreme Court heard Westerfield’s first challenge to his death penalty verdict.

    Danielle disappeared from her Sabre Springs home in February, 2002.

    Volunteers searched everywhere, and almost a month later found her badly decomposed body in the underbrush off Dehesa Road in El Cajon.

    Six months later, a jury convicted Westerfield who lived across the street from the van Dam family. Jurors found him guilty of murder in the course of kidnapping, kidnapping and possession of child pornography and sentenced him to death.

    Westerfield has been on California’s death row ever since.

    At a hearing Wednesday in Sacramento, the seven-member Supreme Court heard Westerfield’s automatic appeal of that death penalty.

    In a 490 page legal brief, first submitted seven years ago, Westerfield’s lawyer outlined 28 reasons why his client deserves a new trial.

    Among those arguments: the trial judge, William Mudd, wrongly denied Westerfield’s motion to suppress certain evidence; the child pornography charges should not have been heard at his trial, there was insufficient evidence of kidnapping to support that guilty verdict; and Judge William Mudd should have sequestered the jury, to prevent members from being exposed to prejudicial publicity.

    Appellate attorney Mark Greenberg focused on the tainted jury argument at today’s hearing.

    Greenberg said unrelenting news coverage, emotional, public displays of support for the van Dam family, and the “stalking” of three jurors outside the courtroom could have influenced the jury.

    "All of these things were intruding into the courtroom,” Greenberg argued. “Full sequestration of the jurors was appropriate, and if not (during presentation of the evidence), then certainly during deliberations."

    Greenberg argued that keeping the jury away from family, friends and the media by closely guarding their privacy and putting them in hotel rooms at night was required for such an emotional, high-profile case.

    Deputy Attorney General Robin Urbanski disagreed.

    "The trial judge was constantly, daily, reminding the jurors about their obligations to shield themselves from outside influence,” Urbanski told the justices “As issues came up, the court addressed them."

    Westerfield was not present for Wednesday's 30-minute hearing. The justices will issue a ruling within 90 days.

    If Westerfield loses his first appeal, he has other legal avenues to challenge the jury verdict.

    That process could last decades and it’s possible that Westerfield, now 66 years old, could die in custody before his appeals are exhausted and before he’s executed.

    District Attorney Summer Stephan said the 16-year wait for Westerfield’s appeal highlights a shortcoming in the legal system.

    "It's not fair really, to either side, the way the system stalls,” Stephan told NBC 7. “Delay is not really a friend to justice."

    Stephan said she hopes voter approval of a death-penalty reform ballot measure in 2016 will speed up the process.

    The new law directs the state court system to complete death penalty appeals within five years.

    Danielle’s mother, Brenda van Dam, strongly criticized the slow-motion appeals process for her daughter’s killer.

    “We believe that the appeals are frivolous and without merit, and are unnecessarily dragging this case out,” van Damn said in a statement to NBC 7. “There was a full and complete legal defense presented by his qualified attorneys at trial, which put our family and all of San Diego through the ringer. It's time for the jury's verdict to be honored and justice given to Danielle.”


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    A former caregiver serving time for elder abuse was in court Wednesday facing new accusations that she kept a disabled woman captive in her apartment for at least a decade as she pocketed her monthly Social Security benefits.

    Prosecutors say 59-year-old Josefina was found beaten and starved in Shirley Montano’s City Heights Apartment. Court documents say that Montano held Josefina captive for 11 years, but it’s possible she could have been in captivity for as many as 23 years.

    Prosecutors say Josefina suffered an unspecified injury when she was 36 years old and became disabled. Montano was hired as her caregiver and eventually took away her phone and walker and canceled her doctor appointments.

    At one point, Josefina only weighed 81 pounds, according to the Associated Press.

    She also refused to let Josefina’s friends and family visit and drained her bank account. Montano was able to fake Josefina’s identity and collect $910 in benefits every month.

    Montano pleaded not guilty to charges including kidnapping for extortion and elder abuse.

    The prosecutor said Montano’s abuse of Josefina was very similar to the way she abused another woman who was once in her care, Lorraine Vega. Vega, now 80, came to San Diego from Arizona to testify against Montano.

    Recorded phone calls played in court revealed how Montano impersonated Vega while on the phone with her bank in an effort to withdraw money from her account. Purchase records showed she bought tires, purses and other items with her money.

    Montano was convicted of abusing Vega and is currently serving a one-year sentence. She could face life in prison if she’s convicted on the new charges.

    Prosecutors also said Montano is facing a murder charge in the death of a third former patient who died while in her care. That case is still being investigated.


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    It's an issue that Californians tend to have strong opinions on: Should Daylight Saving Time stay the same or should it go? 

    Midterm election projections say that Proposition 7, which gives the Legislature the ability to change daylight saving time (DST), will pass. 

    Prop 7 to keep Daylight Saving Time all year in California was voted on just days after citizens set their clocks back an hour for autumn and winter. 

    People in San Diego had mixed feelings about the potential switch up. 

    "It's sunnier in the morning so it gives me time to get up, walk and exercise," said Nick Paningua in Mission Valley. "It's not as cold." 

    Others said they want longer days at the time when they are coming home from work. 

    "I hate when it gets dark out early and it feels like midnight at 8 o'clock," said Thomas Bozman, who lives in San Diego. 

    But it doesn't necessarily mean DST will be changed immediately. The measure allows a two-thirds vote by the state Legislature to change the current DST schedule, but only if the federal goverment allows it. 

    Assuming Congress approves the change, a supermajority (meaning more than 50 percent) in the California Legislature would have to then pass it. 

    The measure has no direct fiscal impact on the state because changes to DST would depend on future actions by the Legislature.

    Representative Kansen Chu (D-25), a legislative sponsor of the measure, described DST as outdated, even saying that it impacts public health. 

    "University medical studies in 2012 found that the risk of heart attacks increases by 10% in the two days following a time change," said Chu.  

    Those against it say changing the time would unnecessarily cause chaos. 

    Senator Jim Nielsen (R-4) said, "It’s fixing something that is not broken. Our society has acculturated itself to Daylight Savings Time. I think it would create too much confusion to change it again."

    DST usually starts in early or mid-March and ends in Early November. 

    There are states that have opted out of DST including Arizona and Hawaii. Other American territories like Guam and Puerto Rico also do not observe it. 



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    BERLIN, GERMANY - JANUARY 10: An alarm clock meant to symbolize the demand for workers to better determine their working hours stands near where workers from nearby Daimler and General Electric production plants were participating in a strike in demands for better pay and more flexible working conditions on January 10, 2018 in Berlin, Germany. The strike is part of dozens nationwide organized by the IG Metall labour union, which is pressing employers for a 6% increase in wages and the option of a limited, two-year 28 hour work week for workers in particular circumstances. Employers counter the demands would require them to hire at least 150,000 more workers at a time when the German manufacturing sector is already struggling to find qualified workers amidst low unemployment. IG Metall is the world's largest labour union and has 3.9 million members. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)BERLIN, GERMANY - JANUARY 10: An alarm clock meant to symbolize the demand for workers to better determine their working hours stands near where workers from nearby Daimler and General Electric production plants were participating in a strike in demands for better pay and more flexible working conditions on January 10, 2018 in Berlin, Germany. The strike is part of dozens nationwide organized by the IG Metall labour union, which is pressing employers for a 6% increase in wages and the option of a limited, two-year 28 hour work week for workers in particular circumstances. Employers counter the demands would require them to hire at least 150,000 more workers at a time when the German manufacturing sector is already struggling to find qualified workers amidst low unemployment. IG Metall is the world's largest labour union and has 3.9 million members. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

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    As a $3.5 million bond for improvements within the San Diego Unified School District nears closer to passing, parents are wondering how revenue will benefit their child's school.

    If approved, Measure YY will increase property taxes in the district by $60 per $100,000 of assessed home value for 39 years.

    Tuesday was the third time in the last 10 years voters in the district were asked to approve a school improvement bond. SDUSD called Measure Y-Y part of its master plan to make all schools a place where students can feel safe.

    Its first two priorities are campus security and fixing lead contamination found in drinking fountains at several campuses.

    SDUSD Superintendent Cindy Marten said the school board plans on meeting next month to prioritize the rest of its to-do list.

    “You don’t get the check and then tomorrow everything happens,” Marten said. “You have to sequence it in a way that has clear priorities behind it.”

    Every school and student in the district is benefitting from revenue from previous bond measures, like Propositions S and Z.

    Every student has a laptop and there soon will be air conditioning in every classroom, according to Marten.

    Parents can find out what projects are slated for their children’s schools under Measure YY, as well as Props S and Z.

    To those who are disappointed the measure seems to be passing, Marten said “When you invest in education, you invest in complete success of the entire city for long into the future.”


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    After University of San Diego’s season opening 83-66 win against Weber State, Torero head coach Sam Scholl made his way around Jenny Craig Pavilion shaking hands and hugging friends, family, school officials, former players, and just about anybody that was nearby.

    Then the real celebration started.

    When Coach Scholl entered the Torero locker room, the entire USD team started shouting, jumping around and dousing their coach with water to celebrate Scholl’s first career win as head coach.

    The jubilation and commotion could be heard throughout the arena, when coach Scholl emerged his shirt was soaking wet, and he had a memory that will stay with him forever.

    “I had a nice little celebration in the locker room, it was one of those things you’ll always remember - your first win,” Scholl said. “And I got doused with water. Fortunately, I got my jacket off, so I saved that.”

    After playing his college ball at USD, Scholl spent the next 18 years as an assistant coach, 10 of which came on the Torero bench. To get his first win in a gym that has helped shape his life was a big moment for the first-year head coach.

    “It’s just a really special place to me, having been a graduate here and played here and coached here, it made it really, really sweet that our first win was here.”

    Near the end of last season, coach Lamont Smith resigned after being charged with domestic violence. The charges were later dropped.

    At the time, USD Basketball was a program in turmoil with an uncertain future. Now, the program appears to be in a more stable position, with Scholl being promoted to head coach, a talented senior-laden roster and the euphoria of a season opening win.

    When asked about the key to getting through the team’s last season, Scholl said, “I think it’s just having high, high character guys, young men in our program that are about the right things, they’re about each other’s success, they are enjoying each other, it’s really about them.”

    Scholl will put his perfect record on the line Friday as USD plays at UC Davis.


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    While early poll results show presumptive winners in races across the county, the Mayoral race in Escondido is still too tight to project.

    Republican incumbent Sam Abed leads Democratic challenger Paul McNamara by a slim margin, but plenty of votes have yet to be counted.

    With only a few hundred votes separating the candidates, voters will be monitoring the race closely as results file in.

    Abed was elected mayor in 2010 and served on the City Council for six years before that.

    The mayor was invited in May, along with County Supervisor Kristen Gaspar, to the White House to discuss immigration policy with President Donald Trump, Attorney General Jeff Sessions and Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen.

    Abed told the president he was committed to creating a PAC to fight the California Values Act or Senate Bill 54, a law passed last year designed to protect undocumented people in the state. Some say the law makes California a "sanctuary" for immigrants.

    In August an Escondido resident sued Abed in state court, alleging Abed blocked him from commenting on Abed’s Facebook posts, thus violating his right to free speech.

    McNamara, a 20-year Escondido resident, has touted his experience as a Marine and twice-elected trustee on the Palomar College Governing Board.

    He is currently the Executive Director of the Marine Corps Recruit Depot Museum Foundation, according to his campaign website.


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    Exclusive video obtained by NBC 7 shows families detained by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) being dropped off in parts of Central San Diego with no apparent sense of direction.

    A Honduran man among a drop-off group, usually several family units totaling 20 to 40 people, says now that he’s in the U.S. he’s one step closer to getting his 5-year-old son the help he needs.

    “He has bronchial fistula and an umbilical hernia. And from what they told me the fistula is leaking and they don't know if the leak is coming from his heart or his brain,” the man, who wished to remain anonymous, said of his son’s condition.

    He said he risked it all to save his boy’s life.

    A witness to the drop-offs told NBC 7 he’s seen daily drop-offs for at least a week. A video shared with NBC 7 by another witness shows the unmarked charter bus making a drop off on Monday. The family groups that got off didn’t seem to know where to go next.

    “When they released us, they just came and dropped us off here on the bus,” the Honduran man said. “And then they told us from here on out we were on our own.”

    Advocates have asked not to reveal the drop-off locations out of concern for families’ safety.

    The man said he was detained at the Otay Mesa Detention Center for six days in a room with his son and 14 others. This, after a 25-day trek from Honduras to San Ysidro.

    “By making sacrifices. Big sacrifices. Asking for rides. In some cases paying for a bus ride,” he said of his journey.

    Many of the families being dropped off are asylum seekers. ICE spokesperson Lauren Mack said that as of Oct. 23, the agency is unable to help detainees line up their accommodations prior to their release.

    Mack said there’s not enough space in the family-friendly facilities and families can't be housed in regular detention centers.

    The only other option, according to Mack, is to release them. The families are given court dates and monitored through a GPS tracking device until their case is decided.

    The Honduran man said he has family in L.A but he wasn’t able to make a phone call and notify them before his release. He has a court date in two weeks and hopes he can get a visa and worker's permit so his son can get the life-saving surgery he needs.

    The Episcopal Diocese of San Diego is helping those who may need a place to stay until they can contact family in the U.S.

    Donations may be dropped off at Good Samaritan Episcopal Church in UTC area, 4321 Eastgate Mall.


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    Police are looking for a suspect wanted in connection to an armed robbery at a Subway restaurant in Scripps Ranch Wednesday night.

    Jason Patton was the only customer in the sandwich shop on Carroll Canyon Road when the suspect came in.

    Patton was eating his sub and on his phone, so he didn’t initially notice anything was wrong.

    Then, at around 8:30 p.m., the robbery suspect demanded money, according to the San Diego Police Department.

    “He sort of brought his backpack up, put it on the counter, showed a weapon, but didn’t say anything that loudly,” Patton told NBC 7. “Just kind of talked to the clerk and asked for all the money.”

    There were three employees working at the time, but only one was up front.

    The suspect escaped north on Carroll Canyon Road, according to SDPD.

    While he fled, some of the cash fell out of the suspect’s bag, officers said.

    SDPD described the suspect as a man in his 40s or 50s. He was last seen wearing a hoodie and dark jeans.

    No injuries were reported, according to police.

    Though Patton admitted he was a little shaken up. “It does make you think about life a little bit,” he said.

    The Subway temporarily shut down after the robbery.


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    San Diego police on the lookout for a pursuit suspect who slammed into a rideshare driver transporting passengers in Barrio Logan Wednesday morning.

    Uber driver Ramon Padilla says San Diego Police Department officers first saw the hit-and-run driver doing donuts on Interstate 5 near Cesar Chavez Parkway and a pursuit ensued.

    Padilla says the crash was so frightening, it could have ended his Uber career.

    "I see the car, he tried to go left then hit me right away," Padilla said.

    The collision smashed the front end and activated the airbags. Padilla’s car was totaled.

    "When I saw it, I closed my eyes and I waited, then he hit me,” Padilla said.

    Padilla says he was driving two passengers to a downtown hotel around 1:30 a.m. He slowed for a red light on National Avenue at Sigsbee Street, not far from Chicano Park.

    He says the hit-and-run driver was barreling toward him at 70 to 80 mph and tried to make a left-hand turn off Sigsbee.

    “When he hit me it moved me two or three feet on the right side," Padilla said.

    He said at the time of the crash officers were a few blocks away. They followed the noise to Padilla's car, but the suspect had already fled the scene.

    Driving for Uber is Padilla's second job, but the accident left him questioning whether the extra money is worth it.

    “I am scared. You think right away, I am not going to drive Uber no more but you know, accidents happen," Padilla said.

    Despite the damage, Padilla and his passengers were not injured.

    He was able to give police a description of the hit-and-run driver and his license plate number.


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    The NFL season has hit the halfway mark and the Chargers (6-2) are coming off a huge victory against the Seahawks in Seattle.

    Why is it a huge victory? Because the Chargers are the first AFC team to defeat the Seahawks at home since 2011 when the Cincinnati Bengals won 34-12).

    Now the Chargers face another tough task this week traveling to Oakland to face the Raiders. Yes, the Raiders are 1-7 and just got bull rushed by the San Francisco 49ers last Thursday night 34-3, but regardless, it is the Chargers versus the Raiders and the Oakland Coliseum will be blacked out and loud.

    “Yes, yes, it's always a challenge, always exciting,” explained Chargers quarterback Philip Rivers. “I look forward to going there and playing. It's a heck of an atmosphere. It won't be there much longer, so not too many more chances to go in there.”

    This will be Rivers 13th visit to the Coliseum where he is 8-4 all-time. Rivers has thrown six touchdowns and 0 interceptions in the last three games against the Raiders. Even though the Chargers are 10-point favorites, according to oddshark.com, head coach Anthony Lynn knows all too well what happens in “easy” games.

    “Well, it's the National Football League. They know that you can get beat any given Sunday. I told them about the story about the '98 Broncos, undefeated. We go play New York, who has only won three games all year, and we got beat in that game. We went on to win the Super Bowl that year — but that's a game we feel like we played them ten times and beat them ten times, but we got beat that day.”

    On that 1998 team, Lynn was a running back. The Giants beat the Broncos on a game-winning touchdown from Kent Graham to Amari Toomer with 57 seconds left in the game. Lynn knows first hand what happens when a team is riding confident, but the players don’t feel like they have done anything yet.

    “Our focus is it’s a division game,” said center Mike Pouncey. “It’s a big game for us because if we want to get to were we want to be at the end of the season we must win division games and it starts in Oakland.”

    The Raiders are not quite what anyone expected them to be under head coach Jon Gruden, but that doesn’t matter to the Chargers. What matters is Oakland is in their way from being 7-2 and only one game behind the division leader Kansas City Chiefs.

    Nuts N’ Bolts

    • There have been weekly questions about two of the teams best young players, defensive end Joey Bosa and tight end Hunter Henry, and when both could see the field. Anthony Lynn said they are taking it easy with Bosa, but that he is making progress. Henry is recovering from a torn ACL and is eligible to return next week. Lynn said they haven’t had discussions about activating him next week. The team and fans are hoping Henry can make a recovery the way defensive end Melvin Ingram did in 2013 and help catapult the team into the playoffs.

    • Chargers cornerback Desmond King won the AFC defensive player of the week after his game-sealing pick-six against the Seattle Seahawks.

    • Injury report—did not practice: DE Joey Bosa (foot), DT Darius Philon (ankle) Limited: DE Chris Landrum (hip)



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    Philip Rivers #17 of the Los Angeles Chargers talks with head coach Jon Gruden of the Oakland Raiders after a game at StubHub Center on October 7, 2018 in Carson, California. The Los Angeles Chargers defeated the Oakland Raiders 26-10. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)Philip Rivers #17 of the Los Angeles Chargers talks with head coach Jon Gruden of the Oakland Raiders after a game at StubHub Center on October 7, 2018 in Carson, California. The Los Angeles Chargers defeated the Oakland Raiders 26-10. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)

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    At least 11 people were killed when a gunman opened fire in a Los Angeles-Area bar late Wednesday night. A sheriff's sergeant responding to the scene also died.

    Photo Credit: Mark J. Terrill/AP

    People comfort each other as they sit near the scene Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018, in Thousand Oaks, Calif. where a gunman opened fire Wednesday inside a country dance bar crowded with hundreds of people on People comfort each other as they sit near the scene Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018, in Thousand Oaks, Calif. where a gunman opened fire Wednesday inside a country dance bar crowded with hundreds of people on "college night," killing at least 11 people. A deputy who rushed to the scene also died. Ventura County sheriff's spokesman says gunman is dead inside the bar.

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    At least 13 people are dead, including a sheriff's sergeant and the gunman, after a shooting during college night at a bar late Wednesday night in Thousand Oaks, California, authorities said.

    The Borderline Bar & Grill shooting is the deadliest such attack since 17 people were killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, in February. It's also the second mass shooting in less than two weeks. On Oct. 27, a man opened fire at a Pittsburgh synagogue, killing 11 people.

    And Wednesday's shooting comes two days after the one-year anniversary of the deadliest church shooting in U.S. history, a massacre in Sutherland Springs, Texas, that left 25 dead.

    Below, find more information on the deadliest mass shooting incidents in the United States this year.

    October — Pittsburgh Synagogue Shooting
    A prayer service was underway at the Tree of Life synagogue on the morning of Saturday, Oct. 27, when a man with an assault rifle opened fire, killing 11 people throughout the house of worship and injuring four police officers before he was taken into custody. It was the deadliest attack on Jews in U.S. history and authorities said the gunman ranted about the religion during the shooting.

    The accused gunman pleaded not guilty to dozens of federal charges including murder and hate crimes and remains in jail.

    September — Bakersfield Rampage

    Over nearly 40 minutes on Sept. 12, a man in Bakersfield, California, fatally shot five people in several locations, including his ex-wife, before killing himself when a deputy had chased him down. The victims appeared to be targeted and included a man and his adult daughter.

    Investigators said a divorce may have motivated the gunman.

    May — Texas High School Shooting
    A student at Santa Fe High School, southeast of Houston, opened fire on fellow students and staff with a shotgun and revolver on the morning of Friday, May 18, killing 10 people and wounding over a dozen more.

    Authorities have said the student confessed to the rampage and was indicted on charges that include capital murder.

    February — Parkland High School Massacre
    A 19-year-old former student of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, killed 17 students and staff members and wounded 17 more with a semi-automatic rifle on Valentine's Day before being taken into custody about a mile away, authorities said.

    It was the worst school shooting since 2012 and prompted a nationwide gun control movement led by Stoneman Douglas students. The accused gunman remains in jail on 17 charges of murder and 17 more of attempted murder.



    Photo Credit: Mark J. Terrill/AP
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    Sheriff's deputies speak to a potential witness as they stand near the scene Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018, in Thousand Oaks, California, where a gunman opened fire Wednesday inside a country dance bar crowded with hundreds of people on Sheriff's deputies speak to a potential witness as they stand near the scene Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018, in Thousand Oaks, California, where a gunman opened fire Wednesday inside a country dance bar crowded with hundreds of people on "college night," wounding 11 people including a deputy who rushed to the scene. Ventura County sheriff's spokesman says gunman is dead inside the bar.

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    Twelve people were killed Wednesday night when a gunman opened fire inside a Thousand Oaks bar. The victims include a 54-year-old Ventura County Sheriff's sergeant who responded to the call for help at Borderline Bar.

    Here is what we know.

    Victims: Twelve victims are dead, including a 29-year Ventura County Sheriff's sergeant who responded to the scene. Other victims were hospitalized, but details on the injured were not immediately available.

    Location: The shots were fired during a weekly college night party at the Borderline Bar & Grill at 99 Rolling Oaks Drive in Thousand Oaks. The bar has a large dance hall with a stage and a pool room along with several smaller areas for eating and drinking. An estimated 150 to 200 people were in the bar. 

    Family Unification Center: 1375 E. Janss Rd, Thousand Oaks. For information, call the hotline at 805-465-6650.

    Schools Affected: Many in the crowd came from local colleges such as Pepperdine, Moorpark and Cal State Channel Islands. The bar is close to several other universities. All classes were canceled Thursday at Cal Lutheran University in Thousand Oaks

    CSU Channel Islands Information Hotline: 805-465-6650

    Road Closures: Moorpark Road is closed between the 101 Freeway and Rolling Oaks Drive; Rolling Oaks Drive is closed between Moorpark Road to Los Padres Drive; On and off ramps are closed at the 101 Freeway Moorpark Road exit.

    The Gunman: The shooter, armed with a legally purchased Glock 21 equipped with an extended magazine, was identified as 28-year-old Ian Long, of Thousand Oaks. The military veteran was found dead inside the bar by law enforcement officers. It is believed he shot himself.



    Photo Credit: Kent Nishimura/Getty Images
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    People wait in a parking lot along South Moorpark Road in the aftermath of a mass shooting at Borderline Bar on Nov. 8, 2018, in Thousand Oaks, California.People wait in a parking lot along South Moorpark Road in the aftermath of a mass shooting at Borderline Bar on Nov. 8, 2018, in Thousand Oaks, California.

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    Commuters have a new connection over Interstate 5 between La Jolla and UC San Diego west of Interstate 5 and Medical Center Drive on the east.

    The Gilman Drive Bridge was unveiled Thursday to provide an additional access across the busy I-5 corridor. 

    Construction on the bridge began two years ago and has required the closure of I-5 in recent weeks as crews put on some finishing touches.

    The bridge was built through a partnership between the San Diego Association of Governments, Caltrans, and the University of California, San Diego.

    It will be the second on-campus crossing over I-5, according to SANDAG.

    When construction on the bridge began in November 2016, the approximate cost was estimated at $20.6 million. An estimated $15.3 million was expected to come from TransNet, the regional half-cent sales tax for transportation administered by SANDAG. 



    Photo Credit: SANDAG

    Construction of the bridge as of April 2018.Construction of the bridge as of April 2018.

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    NBC 7 News Today


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    A retired deputy U.S. Marshal was killed in a motorcycle crash along a freeway in La Mesa Wednesday morning, officials confirmed.

    At around 5:10 a.m., Heartland Fire & Rescue crews were dispatched to westbound Interstate 8 at State Route 125 for reports of a motorcycle collision. California Highway Patrol officials confirmed one person was killed in the accident.

    The victim of the crash was identified by the U.S. Marshals Service as retired deputy John Brady.

    Ben Walker, public information officer with the U.S. Marshals Service, told NBC 7 Brady had worked for the agency for nearly 26 years before retiring on Jan. 3, 2007.

    Brady was currently working as a court security officer at the federal courthouse in San Diego, Walker confirmed.

    A former U.S. Marshals colleague and friend described Brady as a “gregarious and generous man” who loved riding and racing motorcycles. Brady leaves behind a wife and children.

    The deadly crash Wednesday morning halted the morning commute along I-8 through the exit to Mollison Avenue in El Cajon. No one else was hurt.

    The cause of the crash is under investigation.

    [[500053131,C]]



    Photo Credit: NBC 7
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    One person was killed in a motorcycle crash in La Mesa early Wednesday.One person was killed in a motorcycle crash in La Mesa early Wednesday.

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    Kayla Simmons was enjoying college night with friends at the Borderline Bar & Grill in Thousand Oaks when gunfire broke out.

    They were dancing when they saw someone walk in and begin shooting.

    "It was such a blur, it just happened," she said.

    Her friend Summer said he was shooting everything.

    "And we just saw smoke and we saw the shots taking off so we just tried to get down as fast as we could and get out of there."

    They were among scores of people at the bar Wednesday night when a gunman threw what many thought were smoke bombs and fired bullets. Eleven people were killed along with a Ventura County Sheriff's sergeant who responded to the emergency.

    The gunman was also reported dead. As sheriff's detectives, the FBI and emergency personnel converged to investigate yet another mass shooting, victims told about the harrowing ordeal.

    Mitchel Hunter, 19, from Simi Valley said he saw the shooter.

    "I saw him walk in, and he started shooting," Hunter said.

    Cole Knapp, a freshman at Moorpark College, told The Associated Press that the shooter was wearing a black beanie and black hoodie and holding a handgun. 

    "I tried to get as many people to cover as I could," Knapp said. "There was an exit right next to me, so I went through that. That exit leads to a patio where people smoke. People out there didn't really know what was going on. There's a fence right there so I said, 'Everyone get over the fence as quickly as you can, and I followed them over." 

    He said that he saw a highway patrol officer nearby and yelled at him, "There's a shooter in there."

    Sarah Rose DeSon, a communications major at Cal State Channel Islands from Whittier, was celebrating a friend's birthday when they heard shots. 

    "I'm pretty sure I saw him. I'll never get that picture out of my head," DeSon said. "We dropped, heard gunshots, a lot of gunshots."

    Other people who were at the bar broke windows and jumped out of them to escape the bar. 

    "I know some people went in and knocked out, with a stool, through a window," Summer said.  

    Summer said she spent time in the military years ago and instantly knew that what she heard were gunshots. 

    "I heard 18 to 20 rounds at a time before I got out," she said. 

    Summer and Kayla said their main concern was to take cover. They crawled behind a wooden stage inside the bar and waited until they heard more shots. 

    As they were trying to hid from one place to another they got separated, but ended up finding each other again. 

    "All we tried to do was get ourselves out safe and get everyone else out safe," Summer said.



    Photo Credit: AP

    People comfort each other as they stand near the scene Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018, in Thousand Oaks, Calif. where a gunman opened fire Wednesday inside a country dance bar crowded with hundreds of people on People comfort each other as they stand near the scene Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018, in Thousand Oaks, Calif. where a gunman opened fire Wednesday inside a country dance bar crowded with hundreds of people on "college night," wounding 11 people including a deputy who rushed to the scene. Ventura County sheriff's spokesman says gunman is dead inside the bar. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

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    People took cover under tables and smashed windows in a desperate attempt to escape from a crowded Southern California bar where a gunman opened fire Wednesday night, killing 12 people, including a sheriff's sergeant who responded to the call for help.

    The gunfire began about 11:15 p.m. during a college night party at the Borderline Bar & Grill, said Capt. Garo Karedjian, a spokesman for the Ventura County Sheriff's Office. Many in the crowd came from local colleges such as Pepperdine, Moorpark and Cal State Channel Islands.

    The attacker, identified as a 28-year old veteran from the area, was found dead in an office at the bar after shooting himself, investigators said.

    Ventura County Sheriff Geoff Dean said his agency received multiple calls of shots being fired at the bar, which has a large dance hall, pool room and eating and drinking area. About 150 to 200 people were inside at the time, Dean said.

    "It's a horrific scene in there," Dean told a news conference in the parking lot of the bar.

    Minutes after the first rounds were fired, sheriff's Sgt. Ron Helus, 54, and a California Highway Patrol officer went in to respond to the gunshots. Helus, a 29-year veteran looking forward to retirement soon, was speaking with his wife on the phone when he told her he needed to respond to an emergency.

    "He went in to save lives," Dean said, his voice cracking. "He went in to save other people."

    Witnesses told the Associated Press the hooded gunman used a smoke bomb and was wearing all black with his face partly covered. He first fired on a person working at the door, then appeared to open fire at random.

    The shooter was identified as 28-year-old Ian David Long. Deputies were searching his Thousand Oaks house early Thursday in connection with the shooting. Neighbors told NBC4 he lived at the home with his mother. 

    The weapon was a legally purchased Glock 21 .45-caliber handgun equipped with an extended magazine, Dean said, adding that the department has had "several contacts" with Long over the years. The most recent was in April when he was irate and acting irrationally, prompting a mental health crisis intervention team's involvement, Dean said. He was not taken into custody.

    It is believed the gunman shot himself, he added. The body was found in an office next to the entrance.

    Some witnesses reported breaking through windows and ducking under tables to escape the fusillade. Sarah Rose DeSon of Whittier, a communications major at Cal State Channel Islands in Camarillo, was celebrating a friend's birthday at the bar when she heard the gunfire and noticed what appeared to be a smoke bomb.

    "All I remember was standing there with my friend and I heard the shots," she said. "I'm pretty sure I saw him. I'll never get that picture out of my head. We dropped, heard gunshots, a lot of gunshots.

    "Everyone was under the table so it was hard to get under there. By the grace of God I got to the front door."

    She ran down the stairs, got in a car, and circled the area, yelling her friend's name. She found her friend safe, hiding in the bushes.

    A bomb squad was combing through the scene after some reported smoke bombs going off during the gunfire. There was no word on what motivated the shooting.

    Mitchel Hunter, 19, from Simi Valley, said he saw the gunman. He said he had a short-barreled semi-automatic pistol with a big magazine.

    He said he emptied the magazine and reloaded. The shooter was armed with a single handgun, according to a law enforcement source.

    "I saw him walk in," Hunter said. "And he started shooting."

    Hunter said his friend, Tim Munson, 19, also from Simi Valley, was hospitalized.

    He didn't know his condition. Hunter said he heard some 20 shots and it seemed to take awhile before the police arrived.

    "It took forever to get the cops there," he said.

    Carl Edgar, a regular at the bar, said his mind was spiraling out of control.

    "I'm grateful I wasn't there, but at the same time I wish I could've been there to help," Edgar said. "I don't have enough hands to count how many friends I have in there tonight.

    "It's been a bad night. Wednesdays (are) the most popular because it's college night, just a bunch of lively kids, different colleges all the way from Ventura, all the way down to the Valley."

    Edgar said his friends are OK, but other family members were still waiting for word on their loved ones, including Jason Coffman. His 22-year-old son Cody was still missing Thursday morning.

    "I'm in the dark. They don’t have any information here," Coffman said at a family reunification center. "We're all freaking out. I don’t think his mom could do the waiting thing here. Hospitals are saying nothing. They’re chaotic right now, too."

    Coffman said he plans to visit hospital, searching for his son.

    The shooting came one day before Sheriff Dean planned to retire after 41 years of service. Bill Ayub will assume the post Saturday.

    The massacre was the deadliest mass shooting in the United States since 17 classmates and teachers were gunned down at a Parkland, Florida school nine months ago. It also came less than two weeks after a gunman killed 11 people at a synagogue in Pittsburgh.

    Beverly White, Jonathan Gonzalez, Robert Kovacik, Stephanie Marroquin and Oleevia Woo contributed to this report.



    Photo Credit: Wally Skalij/Getty Images
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    Witnesses console each other near the Borderline Bar on Nov. 8, 2018, in Thousand Oaks, California.Witnesses console each other near the Borderline Bar on Nov. 8, 2018, in Thousand Oaks, California.

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    A 26-year-old man was killed on Interstate 15 in Fallbrook Wednesday after his motorcycle came to a stop in one of the lanes and he was hit by several oncoming cars. 

    The California Highway Patrol (CHP) said the motorcyclist, for unknown reasons, stalled on northbound I-15 south of Rainbow Valley Boulevard just after 5 a.m.

    After coming to rest in the lane, multiple oncoming drivers struck the rider and motorcycle, the CHP said. The motorcyclist died from the impact.

    The deadly crash shut down three lanes of the busy North County freeway for about four hours. Lanes were reopened one by one throughout the morning.

    The victim was from La Verne, California, but his name has not yet been released.

    The crash is under investigation but the CHP does not believe the motorcyclist was impaired. All of the driver involved in the accident remained at the scene and cooperated with authorities.

    The CHP said anyone who may have witnessed the crash can reach out to the CHP Border Communications office with those details at (858) 637-3800.



    Photo Credit: NBC10

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